Greenlawn marker honors female architects in the early 20th century


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A pioneering female architect of the early 20th century who spent the summer on the Green Lawn was awarded a permanent historic sign to the settlement.

Fay Kellogg was considered a leading female architect of her time and an advocate of women’s rights, Huntington town officials said in a marker announcement Tuesday.

“Today we celebrate Fay Kellogg’s contributions, not just the contributions she made here in Huntington, but the legacy and example she left for all working women,” said town director Chad Lupinatch. Told.

Lupinatch was joined by a number of elected and appointed officials, including members of the town’s board of directors, Mark Cuthbertson, Joan Cergor, Ed Smith, and the Green Lawn Centerport Historical Society. We have secured a grant to fund the purchase of markers.

The marker was placed at 22 Boulevard Ave. In 1911 Kellogg was commissioned to design a new home and post office for the Green Loan postmaster near the entrance to the new station opposite the fire department. According to town officials, the building continued to be used as a post office until 1929. Currently it is a residence.

Kellogg was born in 1871 in Pennsylvania. She studied at the Pratt Institute in Washington, DC, Brooklyn and Paris.

While working for architect John R. Thomas, she helped design a recording hall on Chambers Street in Manhattan. She later founded her own architectural firm in 1903. She designed numerous buildings in New York and skyscrapers in San Francisco. She was the lead architect for all American News Company’s national architectural projects.

In 1907 and 1909, she purchased a total of 15 acres of green loan land, town officials said. She spent six months a year on a green loan, raising chickens and commuting to work in the city, town officials said.

Kellogg died at his home in Brooklyn in July 1918 at the age of 47, after the Spanish flu pandemic first became ill in the spring of 1918 at a U.S. military camp. Her obituary states that she was “broken”, but Kellogg is speculated to have been a victim of the 1918 pandemic, Rupinatch said.


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